BAZAAR Career: How to Get Your First Job in Fashion

Photography: Erica Cohen

Photography: Erica Cohen

 

Fashion is one of those industries that can seem near impossible to enter—whether your dream is to become an editor, stylist, designer, photographer, creative director, buyer, publicist… (okay, so there are a lot of options). Even here, we get emails every day asking about potential internships, opportunities to freelance and possible jobs. And we get it; we’ve been there. Getting your foot in the door is the ultimate challenge, which will lead (fingers crossed) to the ultimate reward: your dream job. So we started asking around because everyone has to start somewhere. Herein, how people who work at some of our favourite companies in fashion, from Net-A-Porter and Moda Operandi to Teen Vogue and Paper Magazine, talk about how they got in the door and what they look for when they’re hiring. Prepare your resumés accordingly, friends!

 

Photography: Nikki Erwin

Photography: Nikki Erwin

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Micaela Erlanger, Stylist

Image: The Covetuer

“I’ve had many jobs and internships over the years (working at boutiques, interning in PR and sales showrooms, and even Condé Nast’s exclusive and competitive summer internship program), but I think the most influential experience I had was interning atCosmopolitan. I interned for the senior fashion editor and it was my job to attend all of the shoots and be on set dressing the models and steaming the clothes. I was still in college at the time and I remember thinking to myself, THIS is what I want to do. I became obsessed with work and with styling from that moment on. After that, I went on to intern for my mentor, stylist Annabel Tollman, which turned into six years of assisting.

 

Treat your internship like a JOB and make yourself invaluable. Show up early and stay late. Ask questions. Do whatever you can to gain and learn from the opportunity and write down everything. The variety of experience will prove to be incredibly valuable and will shape your ability to work in what is known to be an incredibly fast paced and competitive business.

 

It’s all about attitude. You have to really want to be here and you have to live, sleep, eat, breathe fashion. Styling is very hard work and it’s not always as glamorous as it seems… Organizational and time management skills are also key, as is resourcefulness. I’m looking for candidates who want to learn, can handle the fast pace and pressure and understand that we are always working on a New York Minute!”

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